Geologic Hazards

landslides - debris flows - rockfall - subsidence - seismicity - radon steeply dipping heaving bedrock - expansive soils and bedrock - collapsible soils

 

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Characterization - Consultation - Mapping - Modeling - Suitability - Solutions

Skyline provides expert level geologic hazard characterization for various types of industries, including residential and commercial development, transportation, energy, mining, and federal and local governments. We provide practical, applied experience to characterize the geologic hazards impacting your site, and consultation throughout the process to help guide decision making, design, and mitigation solutions. Identifying and addressing geologic hazards during the early phases of a project can save time and resources. Skyline understands the challenges that adverse geologic conditions and geologic hazards can pose for your project site. Skyline will provide:

  • Verification through field reconnaissance, characterization, and mapping.

  • Inventory mapping of events and extents through field reconnaissance, photogeologic interpretation, and analysis of high resolution imagery and remote sensing data.

  • Modeling potential landslide and debris flow initiation and process areas, rockfall source, runout, and accumulation zones (regional and site specific).

  • Monitoring of slope movement and rockfall hazards with near-real time radar technology and change detection with deferred data from installed instrumentation and photogrammetric visualization.

  • Seismic and Fault Investigations - mapping, characterization, subsurface investigation (trenching, logging, paleopedology), and DSHA reports.

Castle Rock, South Table Mountain, Golden, Colorado. A rockfall source zone with destructive, historical events.

Castle Rock, South Table Mountain, Golden, Colorado. A rockfall source zone with destructive, historical events.

Fault trench investigation in Southern California.

Fault trench investigation in Southern California.

A far-off view of North Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado. This flat-topped mesa is capped by ancient flows of monzonite and latite basalt which are highly fractured, columnar-jointed and form steep cliffs which are notorious for rockfall events. South Table Mountain is off to the right of the photo and also has the same hazards, including landslides.

A far-off view of North Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado. This flat-topped mesa is capped by ancient flows of monzonite and latite basalt which are highly fractured, columnar-jointed and form steep cliffs which are notorious for rockfall events. South Table Mountain is off to the right of the photo and also has the same hazards, including landslides.